Inside Lenovo ThinkPad P15v – disassembly and upgrade options

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One of this laptop’s major perks as a workstation is its ability to work with ECC memory.

Check out all Lenovo ThinkPad P15v prices and configurations in our Specs System or read more in our In-Depth review.

1. Remove the bottom plate and battery

Before you start removing the bottom panel of this device, you need to remove the SIM card tray. Then, undo all 8 Phillips-head screws, and pry the panel with a plastic tool, starting from the front edges.

2. Battery

Battery-wise, there is a 68Wh unit that should be unplugged before you remove anything from the motherboard.

3. Мemory and storage

In terms of memory, you have two SODIMM slots, which fit up to 64GB of DDR4 memory in dual-channel mode. And if you have the laptop configured with a Xeon processor, you can take advantage of ECC RAM as well. Thankfully, there are two M.2 PCIe x4 slots for storage, which support the RAID technology.

4. Cooling system

Two heat pipes are cooling both the CPU and the GPU. Interestingly, Lenovo used only one heat spreader and one fan to deal with heat dissipation. Also, you can see that while the graphics memory is cooled by some metal shrouds, the VRMs are left to suffer.

Check out all Lenovo ThinkPad P15v prices and configurations in our Specs System or read more in our In-Depth review.

Lenovo ThinkPad P15v Gen 1 in-depth review

Usually, it takes us more than 6 months to take in a workstation laptop for a review. Now, this happens to be our fourth review of such a machine, in the span of three weeks, which is insane. This means we can provide a better insight on the ThinkPad P15v (in this case), given the fact we can compare it to some fresh devices, such as the HP ZBook Power G7. Similarly to the latter, the ThinkPad comes with almost every Comet Lake-H processor, maxing out with the Core i7-10875H. Additionally, y[…]

Read the full review

Pros

  • Great upgradability plus ECC and RAID support
  • ThinkShield Security Suite
  • HDR 400 and Dolby Vision support
  • Lack of PWM (LG LGD064C)
  • Covers only 99% of the sRGB color gamut and 98% of the Adobe RGB gamut(LG LGD064C)
  • Industrial look and rigid structure
  • Great input devices
  • Thunderbolt 3, great I/O and optional IR face recognition and fingerprint reader

Cons

  • Cooling is not very efficient
  • Mediocre battery life with the 4K panel
  • The Quadro P620 feels outdated in 2021

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